WELCOME!

Thank you for visiting the Watermark Book Company website! It includes the capacity for book searches (by title, author, ISBN or keywords, through the search function at the upper left of this page), online book orders, eBook purchases, information about upcoming events, and reviews of our favorite books. Click on the green menu links to the left for further information. We also have a page featuring books written by Anacortes authors.

 

NEWLY PUBLISHED!

 

PICTURES OF THE PAST - CELEBRATING 125 YEARS OF ANACORTES HISTORY, by Wallie Funk

Published to coincide with the 125th anniversaries this month of the founding of the Anacortes American newspaper (on May 15, 1890) and the incorporation of the City of Anacortes (May 19, 1890), this is a new coffee table book featuring articles and historical photographs from the collection of legendary American editor Wallie Funk. All sales benefit the Anacortes Museum.

 

NEW FROM LONELY PLANET: MAKE MY DAY CITY GUIDES

Create your own perfect days in the world's greatest cities with these lightweight, pocket-sized, mix-and-match sightseeing and activity guide books. They're packed with expert tips and advice, maps and transport planners, and author-recommended restaurants and cafes close to your chosen destinations. Perfect for families. $9.99 each. Available now for Paris, London, Barcelona, New York City, San Francisco, and Tokyo. Other cities coming soon!

 

UPCOMING EVENTS


GEOLOGY OF THE SAN JUAN ISLANDS, with Professor Ned Brown

Anacortes Library, Tuesday, May 26, 7pm

Join WWU Emeritus Professor of Geology, Ned Brown, for a slide show presentation on the glacial and tectonic history of the San Juans. Copies of his book, Geology of the San Juan islands (Chuckanut Editions, $18.95) will be available for purchase at the event. We also have copies available now at Watermark.

 

NEW AND NOTEWORTHY BOOKS  

 

MISSOULA, by Jon Krakauer (Doubleday, $28.95). From the best-selling author of Into the Wild, Into Thin Air, and Under the Banner of Heaven, this is a strak, powerful, meticulously reported narrative about a series of sexual assaults at the University of Montana, in Missoula. The Department of Justice investigated 350 sexual assaults reported to the Missoula police between January 2008 and May 2012. Few of these cases were properly handled by either the universty or the local law enforcement authorities in this bucolic, football-mad college town. But as Krakauer explains, Missoula is not unique, and the stories he presents in this book illuminate the human drama behind the national plague of campus rape.


GOD HELP THE CHILD, by Toni Morrison (Knopf, $24.95) This is Toni Morrison's eleventh novel and her first to be set in the current moment. Spare and unsparing, fierce and provocative, it weaves a tale about the ways the sufferings of childhood can shape, and misshape, the life of the adult. The central character is a young woman who calls herself Bride. She is beautiful and bold, but her stunning blue-black skin causes her light-skinned mother, Sweetness, to deny her even the simplest forms of love. Then there's Booker, the man Bride loves but loses to anger; Rain, a mysterious white child with whom she crosses paths; and Sweetness herself, who takes a lifetime to understand that "what you do to children matters. And they might never forget."

 

EARLY WARNING, by Jane Smiley (Knopf, $26.95). A riveting, emotionally engaging journey through mid-century America, as lived by a remarkable family, the Langdons, with roots in the heartland of Iowa. When farming patriarch Walter Langdon dies suddenly, his five adult children must look to the future. Only one remains in Iowa to work the land. The others scatter to Washington DC, California and everywhere in between, each following a different path in a rapidly changing world, and raising children of their own. Early Warning continues Jane Smiley's epic trilogy that began with Some Luck and will eventually span the entire twentieth century in America.


THE ROAD TO CHARACTER, by David Brooks (Random House, $28.00). In his previous book, The Social Animal, New York Times columnist David Brooks explored the neuroscience of human connection and how we can flourish together. Now, in The Road to Character, he focuses on the deeper values that should inform our lives. Responding to what he calls the culture of the Big Me, which emphasizes external success, Brooks challenges us, and himself, to rebalance the scales between our "resume virtues" - achieving wealth, fame and status - and our "eulogy virtues," those that exist at the core of our being: kindness, bravery, honesty, or faithfulness, focusing on what kind of relationships we have formed.



 
 
 
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